Projects

A Social Network Analysis For Knowledge Integration and Extension of WEPGN Research

A Social Network Analysis For Knowledge Integration and Extension of WEPGN Research

Principal Investigator - Dr. Lalita Bharadwaj, University of Saskatchewan, Dr. Diane Dupont, Brock University and Dr. Lori Bradford, University of Saskatchewan

Solutions for complex water challenges not only require the development of novel data collection and modeling tools, but also the creation of strong research clusters and innovative knowledge mobilization instruments. There is a need to understand the focus and nature of interdisciplinary collaborative research, as well as the functionality and collaborative nature of the networks of researchers, extension and integration of partnerships.

Indigenous Water Co-Governance: Emerging Models of Distributed Water Governance in British Columbia and Alberta

Indigenous Water Co-Governance: Emerging Models of Distributed Water Governance in British Columbia and Alberta

Principal Investigator - Dr. Carrie Bourassa, First Nations University of Canada

The emphasis on Indigenous law is of pressing importance given that evolving legal frameworks have created expanded approaches to Indigenous title, rights, and traditional territories and hence expanded roles for Indigenous peoples in resource governance. This creates a challenge for all levels of government (including Indigenous governments), as new models of governance (and stakeholder relationships) are being debated and indeed created.

Managing Water and Watersheds for Co-benefits: Human well-being and ecosystem services in the Credit River Watershed

Managing Water and Watersheds for Co-benefits: Human well-being and ecosystem services in the Credit River Watershed

Principal Investigator - Dr. Martin Bunch, York University and Dr. Karen Morrison, York University

The overall goal of this project is to develop and implement a process for scenario planning in the Credit River watershed that is oriented to managing ecosystem services for human health and well-being. 

Ecosystem services for human well-being in the Credit River Watershed: A comparison of monetary valuation, <span> multi-criteria non-monetary valuation and multi-scale integrated analysis of societal and ecosystem metabolism</span>

Ecosystem services for human well-being in the Credit River Watershed: A comparison of monetary valuation, multi-criteria non-monetary valuation and multi-scale integrated analysis of societal and ecosystem metabolism

Principal Investigator - Dr. Martin Bunch and Dr. Diane Dupont

Human health and well-being is fundamentally dependent on services provided by ecosystems. However, the importance of ecosystem services (ES) to human well-being, and of managing ecosystem and watershed resources to maintain such services, is not commonly understood by the public, and not well-enough articulated by environmental management and governance organizations.

Bottled Water Use On the Land: Economic, <span> Social and Policy Implications of Water Consumption Choices While Pursuing Livelihoods and Undertaking Recreational Activities</span>

Bottled Water Use On the Land: Economic, Social and Policy Implications of Water Consumption Choices While Pursuing Livelihoods and Undertaking Recreational Activities

Principal Investigator - Dr. Diane Dupont, Brock University, Dr. Viktor Adamowicz, University of Alberta, Dr. Marcia Spetch, University of Alberta and Dr. Brenda Parlee, University of Alberta

The proposed research (development/administration of a survey in the NWT) builds upon existing knowledge in two important ways. First, it investigates use of water substitutes by peoples of the North (both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people) and individuals who pursue traditional trapping, hunting, or fishing livelihoods on the land.

ReFRESH: Canada-US Transboundary Water Governance and the Columbia River Treaty Renegotiations

ReFRESH: Canada-US Transboundary Water Governance and the Columbia River Treaty Renegotiations

Principal Investigator - Dr. Michele-Lee Moore, University of Victoria and Dr. Dustin Garrick, McMaster University

The Columbia Basin is at a crossroads due to the potential termination of the 1964 Canada-US Columbia River Treaty. Once widely recognized as a world-leading, innovative approach to transboundary water governance, concerns are mounting about whether the renegotiation process can address the numerous issues that have emerged since 1964 and regain the Columbia River’s status as a recognized global leader in transboundary governance.

Extending Municipal Water Demand Forecasting Capacities by Incorporating Behavioural Responses

Extending Municipal Water Demand Forecasting Capacities by Incorporating Behavioural Responses

Principal Investigator - Dr. Steven Renzetti, Professor, Brock University, 2013-2014

Growing urban water demands are putting increasing pressure on the infrastructure of many water agencies, signaling the potential need for greater capital investments. Most water agencies forecast demand by multiplying future population estimates with historical per capita water use. However, this approach tends to be inaccurate by failing to account for other demand drivers, such as income, price and household appliance holdings.

Improved Water Demand Forecasting to Promote Sustainable Water Management

Improved Water Demand Forecasting to Promote Sustainable Water Management

Principal Investigator - Dr. Steven Renzetti, Brock University

Forecasting water demands on a daily basis is remarkably difficult. Variables such as  weather conditions, operational changes, watermain breaks, business cycles, human behaviour, economic and social factors effect water demand forecasting, but it is difficult to quantify those factors and thus difficult to make an accurate prediction.

A pilot project to develop an integrated Canadian hydro-economic model

A pilot project to develop an integrated Canadian hydro-economic model

Principal Investigator - Dr. Diane Dupont, Brock University

Governments in Canada currently do not have the capacity to analyze the two-way relationship between economic activities and hydrologic conditions at the river basin level. Canada also does not have an integrated hydro-economic computer model for practical policy and decision-making towards sustainable water use.