Outputs and Highlights

Economic Analysis of Source Water Protection

Economic Analysis of Source Water Protection

Principal Investigator - Dr. Vic Adamowicz, University of Alberta, 2013-2016

The overall objective of this project is to develop a framework for the economic analysis of alternative methods of protection of water quality that include consideration of ecosystem services such as upstream source water protection as an alternative to infrastructure investments.

Integrated Analysis of Land Use and Water Quality: Economic, <span> Hydrological and Policy Analysis</span>

Integrated Analysis of Land Use and Water Quality: Economic, Hydrological and Policy Analysis

Principal Investigator - Dr. Ian J. Bateman, University of East Anglia, United Kingdom, 2013-2017

Land use and changes in that use play a major role in determining the quality of rivers and lakes. Indeed the effectiveness of water quality management will always be compromised without a clear understanding of land use influences.

Beyond Physical: Impacts of Water Regulations in First Nations Communities

Beyond Physical: Impacts of Water Regulations in First Nations Communities

Principal Investigator - Dr. Lalita Bharadwaj, University of Saskatchewan, 2012-2015

In Standing Buffalo Dakota First Nation, there is increasing pressure on water resources by increased cottage development, sewage disposal to the river system, management of the Qu’Appelle and Gardiner Dams, impacting water flows and levels and increased flooding events.

Human Well-being, <span> Ecosystem Services and Watershed Management in the Credit River Valley: Web-distributed Mechanisms and Indicators for Communication and Awareness</span>

Human Well-being, Ecosystem Services and Watershed Management in the Credit River Valley: Web-distributed Mechanisms and Indicators for Communication and Awareness

Principal Investigator - Dr. Martin Bunch, Faculty of Environmental Studies, York University, 2013-2015

This project is a collaborative effort between Credit Valley Conservation(CVC) and York University researchers to identify and communicate health and well-being benefits of watershed natural features and ecosystem processes. 

Water Governance and Watershed Planning in British Columbia First Nations Communities

Water Governance and Watershed Planning in British Columbia First Nations Communities

Principal Investigator - Dr. Leila Harris, University of British Columbia, 2012-2016

First Nations governance processes are particularly complex, with a suite of legislation and federal institutions, as well as the broader context of self-governance important for these communities. This research will contribute to a more complete understanding of the interactions between First Nations and the current water governance framework in British Columbia and the complex interactions First Nations have had within this framework.

Responsiveness of Household Water Demands to Price and Non-Price Conservation Tools

Responsiveness of Household Water Demands to Price and Non-Price Conservation Tools

Principal Investigator - Dr. Diane P. Dupont, Brock University, 2012-2015

Water utility managers are increasingly turning to price tools (raising water rates) instead of traditional non-price tools (summer water restrictions) to encourage conservation. However, there is little information on the responsiveness of consumer demands to price changes. Establishing the efficacy of such a tool for curbing water use is one policy problem addressed by this research.

Analysis of Avoided Water Utility Costs from Wildfire Risk Mitigation

Analysis of Avoided Water Utility Costs from Wildfire Risk Mitigation

Principal Investigator - Dr. Monica B. Emelko, University of Waterloo, 2012-2015

Forested watersheds are severely threatened by wildfire in western Canada. The eastern slopes of the Rocky Mountains in southwestern Alberta produce the majority of surface water supplies supporting Alberta’s population, and recent increases in magnitude and severity of wildfires along with provincial water demand result in a pressing need to evaluate wildfire risk to downstream drinking water supply and treatment.

Measuring and Mobilizing Citizen Preferences for Source Water Protection

Measuring and Mobilizing Citizen Preferences for Source Water Protection

Principal Investigator - Dr. John Janmaat, University of British Columbia, 2013-2015

Three themes dominate environmental management: public participation, use of the best science, and cost effectiveness.  While economic valuation has grown in prominence as an aid to achieving cost effectiveness, its methodology has been challenged as inappropriate for complex situations outside of respondents’ knowledge and experience. 

Water Policy and Extreme Climate Events

Water Policy and Extreme Climate Events

Principal Investigator - Dr. Ted Horbulyk, Department of Economics, University of Calgary, 2012-2015

Canadians are at increasing risk from water‐related events such as multiyear droughts, flooding and/or significant changes in historical precipitation patterns.  Extreme hydrological events can also hinder our ability to protect and manage groundwater resources. 

Great Lakes Governance Reform for Place-based Regeneration of the Natural and Built Environment

Great Lakes Governance Reform for Place-based Regeneration of the Natural and Built Environment

Principal Investigator - Dr. Gail Krantzberg, McMaster University, 2012-2014

Restorative development involves renewing or reusing the health, beauty, quantity, and functionality of natural, built and socio-economic assets, to enhance their value without depleting or destroying other assets of long-lasting or irreplaceable quality. It is central to sustaining a revitalized Great Lakes basin ecosystem.

From Fracking Conflicts to Innovation Generation: a Case Study of Water Governance in Northeastern B.C.

From Fracking Conflicts to Innovation Generation: a Case Study of Water Governance in Northeastern B.C.

Principal Investigator - Dr. Michele-Lee Moore, University of Victoria, 2013-2015

The Horn River Basin overlaps with the Fort Nelson First Nation (FNFN) traditional territory, and has been an active site of hydraulic fracturing development. This has increased the demand for water in the Basin. While it is well established that effective water governance requires collaboration from a wide array of actors, barriers to including Indigenous Nations in water governance remain as a legacy of Canada’s colonial history.

Applying Resilience Analysis to a Transboundary River System: Developing Surrogates for Governance

Applying Resilience Analysis to a Transboundary River System: Developing Surrogates for Governance

Principal Investigator - Dr. Ryan Plummer, Brock University, 2012-2015

Uncertainty and complexity has prompted movement towards a complex adaptive systems viewpoint. Social-ecological resilience is conceptually concerned with the amount of change a system can withstand, the degree of self-organization possible, and the ability to learn and adapt. Understanding thresholds and regimes shifts are critical to adaptability and transformations.

Assessing Policies to Improve Water Quality in Agricultural Landscapes

Assessing Policies to Improve Water Quality in Agricultural Landscapes

Principal Investigator - Dr. Alfons Weersink, Department of Food, Agricultural & Resource Economics, University of Guelph, 2012-2015

The purpose of this research was to examine the cost effectiveness of farming systems to reduce nitrate leaching associated with agriculture in PEI.  An integrated economic – hydrologic optimization model was used to estimate the cost of adopting non-traditional beneficial management practices (BMPs) and the resulting impact on nitrate leaching.

Costing Climate Change: a case study of employing climate, <span> land-use and water quality data to assess the economic impacts of climate change on local public health.</span>

Costing Climate Change: a case study of employing climate, land-use and water quality data to assess the economic impacts of climate change on local public health.

Principal Investigator - Dr. Steven Renzetti, Brock University, 2012-2015

The linkage between climate change and the presence of water-borne pathogens and health risks may have significant economic, policy and governance implications for local communities. However, many communities in Canada do not have the capacity to study, assess and act upon these sources of risks to public health. The purpose of this research is to build on an existing set of field studies being undertaken by Mazumder in order to do three things.

Evaluating collaborative approaches to governance for water allocation in Canada: Lessons from Ontario

Evaluating collaborative approaches to governance for water allocation in Canada: Lessons from Ontario

Principal Investigator - Dr. Rob de Loe, Department of Environment and Resource Studies, University of Waterloo, 2012-2015

The purpose of this research was to evaluate the effectiveness and appropriateness of collaborative approaches to dealing with water scarcity and conflicting demands for water. The Province of Ontario provided the institutional setting for the study. We were particularly concerned with the extent to which collaboration provides an effective and appropriate basis for water sharing in cases where agriculture is a prominent user. This led us to a focus on the Ontario Low Water Response (LWR) program.

Bridging the Gap: Exploring the Potential for Community-based Watershed Monitoring to Enhance Ecosystem Health and Watershed Governance in Canada

Bridging the Gap: Exploring the Potential for Community-based Watershed Monitoring to Enhance Ecosystem Health and Watershed Governance in Canada

Principal Investigator - Dr. Heather Castleden, Queen's University, 2013-2015

Watershed monitoring is an essential component of watershed management; however, widespread federal and provincial decentralization efforts have resulted in reduced government funding for such monitoring. In response, communities are mobilizing to address this deficit in Canada by undertaking a practice called community-based watershed monitoring (CBWM).

Extending Municipal Water Demand Forecasting Capacities by Incorporating Behavioural Responses

Extending Municipal Water Demand Forecasting Capacities by Incorporating Behavioural Responses

Principal Investigator - Dr. Steven Renzetti, Professor, Brock University, 2013-2014

Growing urban water demands are putting increasing pressure on the infrastructure of many water agencies, signaling the potential need for greater capital investments. Most water agencies forecast demand by multiplying future population estimates with historical per capita water use. However, this approach tends to be inaccurate by failing to account for other demand drivers, such as income, price and household appliance holdings.